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Supply Chains and Information Technology

Yes, the bridge is here. I call myself a geeky Accountant. The business professions of the past still exist today but are combined with technology. The Supply Chain disciplines of today are simply the old ones like Accounting, Economics, Finance, Marketing and even Law combined with technology.

If you want to not be left behind you need to embrace your profession and combine it with the changes of how we do things today.

 

Modern day supply chains are tasked with responding at lightning speed. Like our central nervous system helps us make good decisions, perform physical feats, and communicate effectively and efficiently with those around us, information technology is required to help our supply chains efficiently perform at peak levels. This module illustrates how our uses of technology mirror those of the supply chains use of modern information technology systems.

This is the 12th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

 

 

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Quality

Quality management is overlooked as a tool in both the supply chain and digital and social media as part of the business process. Today, people use technology to focus on how to buy whatever at the cheapest price possible. Well, we were taught, if you sell on price, you lose on price. So how are you pricing your product or service?

In the supply chain maintaining price is a necessity on both sides of the transaction. You need to provide a cost effective price for the client while protecting profit for the company. How do we handle it?

We protect profit throughout the supply chain in order to maintain quality. Imagine if you needed brain surgery. Do you go on the search engines and search for “cheapest brain surgeon”. I hope not. Why should you be any different in searching for any product or service.

Saving money is a good thing but not at the expense of buying cheap. Quality does count.

 

Supply chains are tasked with producing high quality products and services on a consistent basis, thus supply chain management is an entire exercise in quality management. In this module well illustrate the enormous task of developing, managing, and improving quality. In addition, youll see why world-class supply chain managers are in fact world-class quality managers.

This is the 11th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

 

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Measuring Performance

I always tell people that 1+1=2 in the world of an Accountant. Their are times when measuring things that it seems that 1+1 = anything but 2 and the reason is a failure of understanding what you are measuring.

Working today for a business or growing your own requires fundamental knowledge of what you are doing. If not all your reports could be 100% accurate and yet measure 100% useless knowledge. We use to call it GIGO garbage in, garbage out. In my opinion, that is why must of the online resources fail to deliver, they fail to take into account the common sense fundamental knowledge that makes each business different.

Supply chains are tasked with being effective, efficient, and adaptable. While the best companies on earth claim to have strong supply chains, it is only via performance measurement that managers and executives can truly prove the strength of their supply chains. Also, since continuous improvement is a business imperative, managers are constantly being asked to demonstrate positive outcomes and consistent improvement quantitatively. This module introduces the multi-layered world of performance measurement and its relationship to world-class supply chain management.

This is the 10th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

 

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Business Processes

Understanding the business processes in the supply chain is like measuring the velocity of money in the economy. How many jobs are created due to that one click when you purchase something online?

 

The moment a customer places an order through a simple business process dozens if not hundreds of other business processes are set into action. Like miniature cells that make up the entire body, business processes are the small working pieces that together encompass the supply chain. Thus supply chain managers are tasked with making every business process within a supply chain effective, efficient, and adaptable. Through this video youll begin to learn why companies and supply chains are dependent on well-designed and well-managed business processes to expand and grow in a healthy manner.

This is the 9th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

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Socially Responsible Supply Chain Management

In a world of digital and social media businesses and companies now have to respond to news even if they are not directly responsible. Today, bad news may have nothing to do with a company’s product or service.

Is you company moving away from your town? Does it hire more than 5% of the population? Is it leaving to simply lower its tax bill? These are some of the scenarios which can torment a company  in a \n era of social media. counter advertising is is simply not enough.

Why are social responsibility and sustainability such important considerations for modern supply chain managers? This episode illustrates why socially responsible supply chains are not simply important for the sake of public relations and compliance. Socially responsible and sustainable supply chains present competitive opportunities that benefit companies, communities, the environment, customers, and in the case of disaster relief, victims. Supply chain managers are the key to a better tomorrow.

This is the 8th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site athttp://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

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Global Supply Chain Management

Local is global. Yes, the grass always seems greener on the other side. Many companies look to off-shoring, out-sourcing and global expansion as a solution to run away from their problems. The reality is they do it for all the wrong reasons. Yes, local is global and companies need to learn how to properly compete in the global supply chain.

Nearly all modern supply chains have global aspects. Even successful supply chains that dont today will likely have to at least consider offshoring and global expansion in their future. This episode demonstrates how global supply chain managers are vital to facilitating and managing offshoring and global expansion projects.

This is the 7th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site athttp://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

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Supply Chain Integration

When you are a recent graduate you start the process of joining the real world. Much of the knowledge is segmented and it may seem overwhelming. What you need to learn now and in reality it will come only from experience is putting the pieces of the puzzle together.

The supply chain is not one task, it is possible hundreds of task, each creating work and it’s own set of jobs within that puzzle. Hopefully, the following video will shed some light on the new jobs and titles created in the supply chain.

Individually, purchasing, operations, and logistics management do not comprise supply chain management. Supply chain management requires network integration. Integration is only possible when organizational philosophies are compatible across the supply chain and when supply chain partners work as cooperative and coordinated teams. Modern organizational supply chain leaders need to understand the importance of integration internally and externally. Modern supply chain skills are required by elite corporate executives around the world.

This is the 6th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

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Sell it & Service It: Retail Considerations

We all want sales. It is not only foolish to think that money grows on trees, but that is what businesses are becoming guilty of as they move from brick and mortar to web presence only business models. what are the consequences?

Today, many businesses are lured by the false sales of digital and social media believing that with an app and a presence on the web you can let go of most of your employees, safe the insurance and tax costs while eliminating your governmental regulations. Larger companies take it a step further and move their home offices to a P.O. Box overseas claiming they are no longer United States based companies. That is the path to failure that technology and yes even politics has been presenting to businesses and large companies.

Well, if you want to sell it, you better service it and here are some retail considerations in the following video that you should pay attention to if you want to be or stay successful.

 

Sell it & Service It: Retail Considerations
Part 5 of 12 Retail stores the final frontier of supply chain management? Well, not quite, but retail is an extremely important supply chain consideration. Retail facilities can be the final connection between the supply chain and the consumer. A weak retail link can render the rest of your supply chain useless. What are the supply chain responsibilities of retail facilities? Retail facilities handle materials, produce services, manufacture retail experiences, and move product throughout their facilities.

This is the 5th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

 

 

 

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Move It: Transportation and Logistics

I talk about transportation and logistics jobs and most college graduates think I am talking jobs as a bus or truck driver others think I am talking about being a stock boy. Well, think again, I am talking about high paying management jobs in manufacturing companies all around the world including the North East Corridor in the United States.

I enjoy bringing friends to NYC via the Lincoln Tunnel where right before the first overpass their is a sign. Welcome to NJ. The embroidery capital of the world since 1845.

Our typical client:

  • Has been in business for over 100 years
  • Is debt free
  • Owns their property
  • Average employee has been their for 15 years or more
  • Pays for 100% of employee benefits
  • All use transportation and logistics (smile)

So why are so many people not finding work in the Northeast? It is because these companies average 15 to 40 employees in size and are family and privately owned. Yes these are not Wall Street based companies.

So you may just want to consider a career in transportation and logistics. As always here is a little video you.

 

Logistics. Transportation. Same or different? By looking at our personal travels, we can discover some of the responsibilities of modern logistics and transportation managers. Global logistics is packed with stories of global travel. Youll never again look at your clothes, cars, and food the same way again. Its also very likely youll begin to appreciate the efforts of logistics executives that work so hard to deliver your goods when and where you want them in perfect condition at just the right price.

This is the 4th installment in Arizona State University’s twelve-part introduction to supply chain management video series developed by Eddie Davila, Jeff Hough, Randy Cates, Dawn Feldman, Dan Ichikawa, Ian Schmoel, and Matt Hardy. ASU, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Supply Chain Management Department are proud and happy to share this video series with supply chain management departments, supply chain instructors, career specialists in high schools and universities, as well as industry leaders in an effort to inspire a new generation of supply chain management professionals across the country and around the world.

For more information, visit W. P. Carey’s SCM Web site at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/scm or send an e-mail to wpcarey.scm@asu.edu.

 

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Few schools impress me today and then I found

Yes, few schools impress me today, in fact most disappoint me, then I came across students from W. P. Carey School of Business. I proudly wanted to show this online interview with Lee Ohanian, Associate Director of CASEE.

Lee Ohanian, Associate Director of CASEE and the staff at the W.P Carey School of Business I think is successfully teaching the badly needed basics of the business world while combining it with the new changes in technology we all face in a global business market.

Here is the interview.

 

Produced by the ASU Center for the Advanced Study in Economic Efficiency (CASEE), the Profiles of Leaders and Efficiency in Freedom series profiles business leaders and entrepreneurs. In this installment, Lee Ohanian, Associate Director of CASEE, talks with Robert Hobbs, Sr., Chairman, Naumann/Hobbs Holdings.

 

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